Do we really have to talk about everything all of the time?

Serious question: What goes through people’s minds when, upon seeing a single topic posted or discussed, their comment is along the lines of, “This happens for X too!” or, “You didn’t also talk about Y and Z so therefore what you’re discussing right now is invalid.”

Do we really have to talk about everything all of the time?

In that case, for the record, I don’t kick puppies. I don’t think I’ve ever actually stated that I don’t, so it might come up when I talk about apples, and since the default is to assume the worst because that’s easier than thinking. . . .

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I asked my friends via Facebook if this only seems to happen more during online conversations.

One responded, “It does seem that people with only tangential information are more willing to volunteer it online than in person. The lack of opportunity for withering looks seems to embolden.”

There might be something to that!

All This Twitter Account Does Is Tweet Art, And That’s Pretty Neat

There’s a name and even a face.

There are over 13,000 followers.

And all this Twitter account seems to do is tweet and retweet art pictures from other Twitter accounts.

Here’s one:

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by Patrick William Adam, R.S.A, from Edinburgh, Scotland (1852-1929)

 

It’s particularly nice because some of these artists can’t very well tweet it themselves.

But you know what’s grand about this? Erin Harris, who first brought this account to my attention, put it thusly: “It’s like making my Twitter profile into Pinterest without having to go to Pinterest. I can look at my feed when I need to see some beauty.”

It’s true for the rest of us, too. If you follow this account, you will see beauty in your newsfeed–and new discoveries.

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Childe Hassam, Apple Trees in Bloom, Old Lyme, 1904

 

“Get your loved ones off Facebook.” Really?

This article allows no comments, so I’m commenting here. I like the prospect of having an actual discussion.

A friend posted Salim’s article about why we all need to remove ourselves from Facebook by January 30. It has to do with even more privacy infringements coming on the heels of “all the spying Facebook does.” You can read all about it here.

The thing is, are we really surprised?

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This is a shrugging cuttlefish, maybe.

Facebook is a business. We may not pay money to create an account or otherwise use its platform recreationally, but we are still paying all along: In information, which is arguably more priceless, but still comes at a cost. A cost that is levied on us.

Businesses are not smiling bankers and angels getting their wings. Just like HR departments, businesses–corporations, franchises, whatever you want to call the place that houses the people that get the goods–are not, generally, here to protect and nurture you at the expense of them.

It’s nothing new. This one just happens to be online.

And it’s on us to decide whether we keep giving up or trading whatever currency it demands in return for whatever goodies we get, or try to change things. Deny those features that can turn your phone’s microphone on. Fight back against its algorithmic filter that decides what it wants you to see. Refuse to use its handy “contact sync” that mines your entire contact list down to your grandma who thinks it’s “The Facebook” and that’s all there is to the internet.

For now, I’m staying with Facebook. I’m also staying aware of what’s going on behind the scenes. (Maybe I figure that by this point, my information is well-embedded in marketing lists!) So we’ll see what happens.

If you’re on Facebook, are you staying or going?

 

Badly Explain Your Hobby

Here’s one of mine: Click bricks together and buy more bricks to click together while rearranging already clicked bricks.

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And Another Story Finished

I’m quite excited. Ever since that oath I took late December 2016, my creativity and inspiration have been soaring.

So much so that, while in the middle of landing “What’s At The End Of Your Nose?” on a delightful person who does formatting for CreateSpace and Kindle, as I took one look at all the templates and guidelines and “Oh, we don’t actually provide a true template for children’s books, but you can try to do it anyway” and more along those lines from both the CreateSpacers and other hopeful children’s book authors, I completed yet another children’s story to add to the three others I have waiting their turn to be published.

That is, it was a children’s story. Within two days from receiving it back from my editor, with her lovely note that encouraged me to add more detail, this story that I’d boxed into a less-than-1,000-words format is now well over 2,000.

I had been trying to confine it when it needed to fly free.

Every time I would sit at my laptop with that story open, I’d be off and running with the tale, expanding, tweaking, refining, adjectiving, and punning. Off it’s gone to my editor again.

This may wind up a middle-grade or young adult book; it may be trimmed, it may be expanded. Whatever the outcome, I’m having an exhilarating time.

I wish you an exhilarating time with your pet project, too!

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Coming soon: “What’s at the End of Your Nose?

Edit: It’s out! Get “What’s at the End of Your Nose?” today.

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